Advice and tips

 

In this section, you will find lots of useful information about you wood burning stove from types of wood to tips on how to light a fire.
It is essential to burn wood that has been properly ‘seasoned’, in other words, it has been left to completely dry out for between ten and twenty four months unless buying KILN DRIED WOOD.

YOUR BEST OPTION IS TO BURN KILN DRIED HARDWOOD LOGS TAKE NO CHANCES WITH SO CALLED SEASONED WOOD THE MAJORITY IS WET AND WON’T BURN, YOU WILL HAVE WASTED YOUR MONEY.

KILN DRIED LOGS BURN STRAIGHT FROM THE BAG

Ideally you should plan fuel requirements wood burning stove and store your logs in a dry location where air can circulate through them.
Managing your log store and preparing logs and kindling is all part of the enjoyment of a wood burning stove and if done correctly, will undoubtedly reward you with the natural smells, sights and sounds that are all unique to wood burning.

Choosing logs When choosing wood for burning there are two significant factors which have an effect on the calorific value (CV) or the amount of available heat per unit (volume) of fuel: 1. Moisture content 2. Wood density
1. Moisture content The moisture content of wood has by far the greatest effect on CV. Any water in the timber has to boil away before the wood will burn, and this will reduce the net energy released as useful heat (as opposed to steam up the chimney). If you can get them to light at all, logs that aren’t dry will result in a fire that smoulders and creates lots of tars and smoke. These tars can be corrosive, potentially damaging the lining of the flue and increasing the danger of a chimney fire. Wet logs will tend to blacken glass in stoves even if the stove is designed to keep the glass clean. Well seasoned logs can have approximately twice the CV of green logs.

You should always take care to burn only dried wood, or KILN DRIED WOOD IS THE BEST TAKE NO CHANCES BURN STRAIGHT FROM THE BAG

TIPS ON THE RIGHT WOOD TO BURN

  • Alder Burns better when mixed with other hardwoods. Good

  • Apple A very good wood that bums slow and steady when dry, it has small flame size, and does not produce sparking or spitting. Good

  • Ash Reckoned by many to be Premium quality wood for burning, it produces a steady flame and good heat output. It can be burnt when green but like all woods, it burns best when dry. Very good

  • Beech Burns very much like ash, but does not burn well when green. Very good

  • Birch Produces good heat output but it does burn quickly. It can be burnt unseasoned, however the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use.

  • Cedar Is a good burning wood that produces a consistent and long heat output. It burns with a small flame, but does tend to crackle and spit and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Good

  • Cherry Is a slow to burn wood that produces a good heat output. Cherry needs to be seasoned well. Good

  • Chestnut A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output. Poor

  • Firs (Douglas etc) A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Poor

  • Elm Is a wood that can follow several burn patterns because of high moisture content, it should be dried for two years for best results. Elm is slow to get going and it may be necessary to use a better burning wood to start it off. Splitting of logs should be done early. Medium

  • Eucalyptus Is a fast burning wood. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire if burned unseasoned. Poor

  • Hawthorn Is a good traditional firewood that has a slow burn with good heat output. Very good

  • Hazel Is a good but fast burning wood and produces best results when allowed to season. Good

  • Holly Is a fast burning wood that produces good flame but poor heat output. Holly will burn green, but best dried for a minimum of a year. Poor

  • Hornbeam A good burning wood that burns similar to beech, slow burn with a good heat output. Good

  • Horse Chestnut A good wood for burning in wood stoves but not for open fires as it does tend to spit a lot. It does however produce a good flame and heat output. Good (For stoves only)

  • Laburnum A very smokey wood with a poor burn. Poor do not use

  • Larch Produces a reasonable heat output, but it needs to be well seasoned. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Medium

  • Laurel Burns with a good flame but only reasonable heat output. It needs to be well seasoned. Medium

  • Lilac Its smaller branches are good to use as kindling, the wood itself burns well with a good flame. Good

  • Maple Is a good burning wood that produces good flame and heat output. Good

  • Oak Premium quality  Because of its density, oak produces a small flame and very slow burn, it is best when seasoned for a minimum of two years as it is a wood that requires time to season well. Good

  • Pear Burns well with good heat output, however it does need to be seasoned well. Good

  • Pine (Including Leylandii) Burns with a good flame, but the resin sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire must be well seasoned. Good (with caution)

  • Plum A good burning wood that produces good heat output. Good

  • Poplar A very smokey wood with a poor burn. Very poor

  • Rowan Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. Very good

  • Robinia (Acacia) Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. It does produce an acrid and dense smoke but this is of course not a problem in a stove. Good (For Stoves only)

  • Spruce Produces a poor heat output and it does not last well. Poor

  • Sycamore Produces a good flame, but with only moderate heat output. Should only be used well-seasoned. Medium

  • Sweet Chestnut The wood burns ok when well-seasoned but it does tend to spit a lot. This is of course not a problem in a stove. Medium (For Stoves only)

  • Thorn Is one of the best woods for burning. It produces a steady flame and very good heat output, and produces very little smoke. Very good

  • Willow A poor fire wood that does not burn well even when seasoned. Poor.

 


BEST OF ALL BURN KILN DRIED WOOD